Opinion: UK Teens Issue Last Rites To Facebook According To Study

Facebook dead to teens in the UK

A recent study from the Global Social Media Impact Study shows what pointed out over the summer—teens in the UK are ditching Facebook for other social media networks. This isn’t surprising at all. As soon Facebook reached beyond the original college students-only audience and allowed for all adults to join, it opened the doors for teens using false ages to join Facebook.

 

This happened with Bebo, Hi5, MySpace, BlackPlanet, HighSchoolClub, CollegeClub, and Friendster. The customization of pages draw young users in, they stick around for a year or so, then leave for the next big thing with the current big thing gets “boring.”

 

It should be noted of course that the listed sites all had specific uses and weren’t actually geared towards teenagers—bar for HighSchoolClub. For some, if teens joined—which most of the sites at one time wanted users 18 or older—they were merely along for the ride and could use the social network’s features to communicate among each other or whatever actor or band might have been using it.

 

That was the original purpose of MySpace: a platform for musicians to showcase their music and connect with fans and to be honest, it did it much better than what Facebook attempted: a profile page basically.

 

So where are the 16-18 year olds going and why? Far be it for me to tell everyone where the kids’ new cool spot is, but the study shows that they’re jumping to Snapchat, Whatsapp, and Twitter. During the summer, it was shown that some are starting to migrate to Tumblr and Instagram if they weren’t there already.

 

Alas, no one is really heading to Google+…unless they join blitz through their YouTube stuff and accidentally join Google+.

 

This brings us to the “why” part of the mystery. Teens surely aren’t leaving for the deep social features or near perfect social ecosystem where everyone knows, everyone of say Twitter, Snapchat, or Instagram. It’s the need for teens to have their space online. One could say they need…cyberspace.

 

At one time the internet was mostly where people who were adept at technology and teens (and some younger kids) who would quickly adapt to the internet and technology hung around. It was a time when mainstream businesses were just jumping onboard with it and parents of the 50s and 60s were just hearing about it.

 

We’ll call that time—the mid 90s roughly. The internet didn’t just pop up around this time, but it became an actual phenomena that started to get press and acknowledgement around this time. At the time the main things used were message boards in addition to the Yahoo trifecta of Groups, Clubs, and Chat.

 

There was some legit concern about what children were doing online, who they were talking to, and so on. The cyber bridge between parent and child was a pretty lengthy, wide one. Facebook not only made the world smaller, but it made the age gap between the two narrow.

 

Parents could monitor what their kids were doing and at the same time keep up relatives, friends, and co-workers. Everything is simplified.

 

It is because of that narrow bridge that teenagers’ freedom is shrunk. In short, it was time to find a new place to hang out as Facebook’s become crowded and “uncool.” This leaves Facebook to the adults, businesses, and college students while delivering chip damage to many Facebook-based freenium games as well and advertisers.

 

The new frontiers teenagers head to—besides Twitter—don’t have the mainstream presence of Facebook and Tumblr is on the rise. The thing here is that those other places such as Snapchat and Whatapp also don’t have the appeal or charm of Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. While they’re simple in execution, it would mean learning another service and getting some familiar faces and that just isn’t worth the trouble to most.

 

Will Facebook attempt to woo teens back to its network? If you’re a parent, did you have a difficult time adapting to Facebook and how often did you use it to monitor activity? Also—as a trip back in time—do you remember the landscape of the internet went it came to social interaction? Share your stories and comments below!

 

Related
T-Mobile Prepaid Services Offering Free Access to Facebook
New Facebook Feature Allows Users To See What Version Of Messenger Contacts Are Using
Microsoft and Facebook Form HackerOne For Bug Bounties
Update: Facebook Goes Back On Graphic Content Ban
Tumblr’s $1.1 Billion Pie Divided Up, Criticism Ensues

 

A recent study from the Global Social Media Impact Study shows what pointed out over the summer—teens in the UK are ditching Facebook for other social media networks. This isn’t surprising at all. As soon Facebook reached beyond the original college students-only audience and allowed for all adults to join, it opened the doors for teens using false ages to join Facebook.

This happened with Bebo, Hi5, MySpace, BlackPlanet, HighSchoolClub, CollegeClub, and Friendster. The customization of pages draw young users in, they stick around for a year or so, then leave for the next big thing with the current big thing gets “boring.”

It should be noted of course that the listed sites all had specific uses and weren’t actually geared towards teenagers—bar for HighSchoolClub. For some, if teens joined—which most of the sites at one time wanted users 18 or older—they were merely along for the ride and could use the social network’s features to communicate among each other or whatever actor or band might have been using it.

That was the original purpose of MySpace: a platform for musicians to showcase their music and connect with fans and to be honest, it did it much better than what Facebook attempted: a profile page basically.

So where are the 16-18 year olds going and why? Far be it for me to tell everyone where the kids’ new cool spot is, but the study shows that they’re jumping to Snapchat, Whatsapp, and Twitter. During the summer, it was shown that some are starting to migrate to Tumblr and Instagram if they weren’t there already.

Alas, no one is really heading to Google+…unless they join blitz through their YouTube stuff and accidentally join Google+.

This brings us to the “why” part of the mystery. Teens surely aren’t leaving for the deep social features or near perfect social ecosystem where everyone knows, everyone of say Twitter, Snapchat, or Instagram. It’s the need for teens to have their space online. One could say they need…cyberspace.

At one time the internet was mostly where people who were adept at technology and teens (and some younger kids) who would quickly adapt to the internet and technology hung around. It was a time when mainstream businesses were just jumping onboard with it and parents of the 50s and 60s were just hearing about it.

We’ll call that time—the mid 90s roughly. The internet didn’t just pop up around this time, but it became an actual phenomena that started to get press and acknowledgement around this time. At the time the main things used were message boards in addition to the Yahoo trifecta of Groups, Clubs, and Chat.

There was some legit concern about what children were doing online, who they were talking to, and so on. The cyber bridge between parent and child was a pretty lengthy, wide one. Facebook not only made the world smaller, but it made the age gap between the two narrow.

Parents could monitor what their kids were doing and at the same time keep up relatives, friends, and co-workers. Everything is simplified.

It is because of that narrow bridge that teenagers’ freedom is shrunk. In short, it was time to find a new place to hang out as Facebook’s become crowded and “uncool.” This leaves Facebook to the adults, businesses, and college students while delivering chip damage to many Facebook-based freenium games as well and advertisers.

The new frontiers teenagers head to—besides Twitter—don’t have the mainstream presence of Facebook and Tumblr is on the rise. The thing here is that those other places such as Snapchat and Whatapp also don’t have the appeal or charm of Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. While they’re simple in execution, it would mean learning another service and getting some familiar faces and that just isn’t worth the trouble to most.

Will Facebook attempt to woo teens back to its network? If you’re a parent, did you have a difficult time adapting to Facebook and how often did you use it to monitor activity? Also—as a trip back in time—do you remember the landscape of the internet went it came to social interaction? Share your stories and comments below!

Related
T-Mobile Prepaid Services Offering Free Access to Facebook
New Facebook Feature Allows Users To See What Version Of Messenger Contacts Are Using
Microsoft and Facebook Form HackerOne For Bug Bounties
Update: Facebook Goes Back On Graphic Content Ban
Tumblr’s $1.1 Billion Pie Divided Up, Criticism Ensues


Starting with Kabir News in 2013, James has focused on tech, gaming, and entertainment. When not writing, he enjoys catching up on sci-fi and horror shows and comics. He can be followed on Twitter @MetalSwift.

8 Comments

  1. Bill says:

    Facebook is definitely on the way out. The hot products for 2014 will be SnapChat, Ravetree, and WhatsApp.

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